Legal Information & Privacy

Contact

If you have any questions or remarks about this website or the Ayeri language in general, feel free to send a message to: (Please enable JavaScript. The mail address has been hidden so as to make scraping a little harder for spambots.).

Copyrights and Such

This website (Benung. The Ayeri Language Resource, ‹https://ayeri.de›) is owned and edited by Carsten Becker. Hosting is obtained from NFSN, Inc. Unless noted otherwise, all materials presented on this website are copyright © by Carsten Becker, all rights reserved.

If you’re sharing my stuff on the internet, that’s awesome, but please be so kind to give credit, e.g. by putting a link back to my site so other people may know where to find out more. If you have questions about using materials from this site in what goes way beyond personal use (say, you want to use an image from “Examples” in a book you intend to sell), please contact me first. If you feel that your rights are violated by any content on this website, please write a notice to the above e-mail address before taking legal action.

This website is built with WordPress (GPLv2). Web fonts (Open Sans Condensed by Steve Matteson, Lobster by Pablo Impallari) tied in with Google Fonts. Some icons used are from the elementary Icons icon set by Daniel Foré (GPL). Avatar images shown next to comments are provided by Gravatar and are thus in the responsibility of every individual commenter, and shown here in good faith, as WordPress fetches these images from a commenter’s Gravatar account automatically.

Ayeri is a fictional language spoken by fictional people in a fictional setting, and as such is not related to any naturally existing languages. It is thus not to be confused with Azeri, a Turkic language spoken in Azerbaijan and its surrounding countries. Ayeri’s vocabulary is entirely a priori, this means, no real-world languages have been used specifically as sources of vocabulary. Due to the language’s sound and spelling aesthetic being inspired by Austronesian languages, it is not surprising if overlaps with existing words in those languages happen accidentally.

Privacy and Commenting policy

Logging, Tracking, etc.

Access to this website is currently logged by the server for security reasons, for instance, in order to act on attempts to bring this website down or to break into it, or to curb spam. The data gathered is – by standard practice – the visitor’s IP address, the accessed file(s), and, if provided, referring URL(s), as well as the visitor’s browser and their operating system. The log files are saved in a folder on the server that is not accessible to the public. Old logs are deleted weekly and logged data is handled confidentially.

However, as a means of preventing spam, code injection, and content harvesting, for instance, every accessing IP address will be screened for recent cases of malevolent behavior by Bad Behavior, which may block site access to widespread malicious URL requests or User Agents commonly used by bad robots. IPs are also screened by Cleantalk as a way to combat comment spam.

As a way to basically crowdsource finding gaps in the dictionary and thus to get inspiration on what to make up words for next, the dictionary query dialog presented on this website logs queries that fail to return any results. It does not log IPs, only the time of access and the query itself.

Commenting

By commenting on an article, a visitor’s e-mail address is automatically saved by the WordPress installation this website runs on and their IP is anonymized to 127.0.0.1 (the actual IP is still in the server logs, though, see above). However, this information is equally regarded as confidential. Any private information visitors choose to include in the publically readable part of comments (that is, “Name”, “Website”, “Comment”), they publish at their own risk. I, as the website owner, reserve the right for myself to moderate or delete comments if I notice them to be abusive, e.g. if they contain harassment or spam. Also see NFSN.net’s hosting policies.

Cookies

Cookies set by this website can be deleted – or disabled for this website or third parties altogether – in your browser’s cookie policy options. How this works will most certainly be documented in your browser’s help file.

This website may set the following cookies in your browser; third party embeds (e.g. embedded tweets or Youtube videos) may themselves set cookies on your computer as well and/or gather data about you on behalf of the embedded content’s provider.

CookieTypeDurationDescription
bb2_screener_temporarybrowser sessionBad Behavior screens your IP for recent malevolent behavior on other websites, according to the blacklist of ProjectHoneypot.org. The cookie is cleared when you close your browser window.
PHP Session IDtemporarybrowser sessionA PHP session ID cookie stores values passed from page to page within the website; it is canceled when you close your browser window.
viewed_cookie_policypersistent1 yearThe plugin 'Cookie Law Info' saves whether you clicked to agree that you're aware of this website possibly setting cookies in your browser.
Click here to delete the 'EU Cookie Law' agreement cookie from your browser.

Changes

  • 2014-02-11: Added link to NFSN.net’s hosting policies
  • 2014-03-11: The WP SlimStat traffic analysis plugin has been removed completely and all its accumulated data has been deleted in accordance with German jurisdiction. A passage about which data is gathered in server logs and by Bad Behavior has been added for clarification.
  • 2014-03-24: Currently trying out AVH First Defense Against Spam as a replacement for Bad Behavior. Text changed accordingly.
  • 2014-03-31: AVH FDAS queries the ZEN list of Spamhaus, not just SBL/XBL. Text changed accordingly.
  • 2014-06-05: AVH FDAS removed, back to Bad Behavior. Text changed accordingly.
  • 2014-12-04: Server log retention shortened to 1 week. Comments save IPs generally as 127.0.0.1.
  • 2015-04-05: Additional information on cookies. Youtube and Twitter embeds set third-party cookies on this website.
  • 2015-04-17: Bad Behavior makes it basically impossible to use caching plugins, so going back to AVH FDAS.
  • 2015-05-08: Caching creates more problems than it solves for now; AVH FDAS in addition proved rather toothless in keeping bad bots out, so yet again back to Bad Behavior. Improved wording in places.
  • 2015-12-06: Removed third-party cookies from cookie list and replaced it with a general disclaimer that embedded content may set cookies in a user’s browser.
  • 2016-01-31: Added statement on the dictionary logging queries with zero results.
  • 2016-03-09: Added warning about embedded content from third-party websites potentially gathering user data.
  • 2017-03-02: Exchanged Project Honeypot DNSBL for cloud-based solution from Cleantalk